Friday, September 28, 2007

Teaching from Intemediate Physics for Medicine and Biology

How can you structure a class using the 4th edition of Intermediate Physics for Medicine and Biology? At Oakland University, we offer two classes--"Biological Physics" and "Medical Physics"--as part of our undergraduate medical physics major. Biological Physics covers the first 10 chapters of the book, and Medical Physics covers the last 8 chapters. Below is the information about these classes in our undergraduate catalog (Note: PHY 102 and 152 are the second semesters of the non-calculus and calculus based introductory physics classes, and MTH 155 is the second semester of introductory calculus):

PHY 325 Biological Physics (4 credits)
Applications of physics to biology, including biomechanics, fluid dynamics, statistical mechanics, diffusion, bioelectricity, biomagnetism, feedback and control.
Prerequisite: PHY 102 or 152, and MTH 155

PHY 326 Medical Physics (4 credits)
Applications of physics to medicine, including signal analysis, imaging, x-rays, nuclear medicine and magnetic resonance imaging.
Prerequisite: PHY 102 or 152, and MTH 155

Friday, September 21, 2007

"The Making of the Book" Story

Nowadays, when a movie comes out on DVD it often includes extras such as "the making of the movie" story. If you want to see "the making of the book" story, go to the American Physical Society, Division of Biological Physics Newsletter website and download the December 2006 Newsletter. It contains an extended interview with Russ Hobbie, in which he describes how he came to write Intermediate Physics for Medicine and Biology.

Friday, September 14, 2007

The Errata

We found an error in the 4th edition of Intermediate Physics for Medicine and Biology this week. Actually, it was Hugo Vrenken of the VU University Medical Center in Amsterdam who found a typo on page 539 in Problem 19 of Chapter 18: an equation has an extra factor of 4 in the denominator. Russ and I tried to ferret out all the mistakes in the book before publication, but inevitably we missed a few. If you are reading the book, you can find the not-yet-too-long list of known errors (the errata) at the book's website: http://www.oakland.edu/~roth/hobbie.htm . Although we really hate to find mistakes in our book, Russ and I are committed to letting our readers know about any that do exist. Please help us by contacting me if you find any mistakes. Thanks!

Friday, September 7, 2007

If you think about it, there are few books that cover this subject

Peter Kahn reviewed the third edition of Intermediate Physics for Medicine and Biology in the American Journal of Physics (vol. 67, pp. 457-458, 1999). Kahn wrote "If you think about it, there are few books that cover this subject. This reflects on the one hand the rigidity of the Physics curriculum, and on the other hand the fact [that] biologists are inadequately prepared to apply physics to the problems they encounter."